Tag Archive | fulltext

Fraternal Bonding in the Locker Room: a Profeminist Analysis of Talk About Competition and Women

Title: Fraternal Bonding in the Locker Room: a Profeminist Analysis of Talk About Competition and Women

Link: pdf

Summary:

Analyzes locker-room conversations to determine origins of sexism in male-bonding conversations.

Sexual Harassment Law: Has It Gone Too Far, or Has the Media

Title: Sexual Harassment Law: Has It Gone Too Far, or Has the Media

Link: pdf

Summary: 

Discusses false perceptions of “too much” sexual harassment law, and how the balance has shifted “too far” in employees’ favor.

 

Our Prisons, Ourselves: Race, Gender and the Rule of Law

Title: Our Prisons, Ourselves: Race, Gender and the Rule of Law

Link: pdf

Summary: 

Prison rape is a canard of popular culture. Comedians from Jay Leno to street-corner wiseguys recycle the tired joke: “Don’t drop the soap,” or some big, scary criminal will make you his “bitch.” This jocular fear is often racialized: “A running joke throughout movies concerns the theme in which a very large Black male prisoner threatens a boy . . . [who may be] raped or ‘punked’  by a Mike Tyson-esque character.” These jokes reveal one of men’s starkest fears about prison: that they will be unmanned or “made gay” by being sexually assaulted by a big black man.

Between Scylla and Charybdis: the Perils of Reporting Sexual Harassment

Title: Between Scylla and Charybdis: the Perils of Reporting Sexual Harassment

Links: pdf

Summary: 

Judicial opinions on sexual harassment portray reporting as the only reasonable course of action for the woman who finds herself the target of sexual harassment in the workplace. The hazards of reporting rarely are discussed, because the law assumes that employers are objective, nondiscriminating entities that do not tolerate harassment in the workplace and that employers’ and victims’ interests coincide. Nothing is further from the truth. Reporting does not solve the harassment problem within an organization, because reporting is a solution to an individual problem. Harassment is not an individual problem; it is an organizational problem.

 

Reporting sexual harassment: Claims and remedies

Title: Reporting sexual harassment: Claims and remedies

Link: pdf

Summary: (abstract)

Sexual harassment has been documented as a widespread and damaging phenomenon yet the specific patterns of behaviour reported in alleged sexual harassment cases and the factors influencing the lodgement of formal, legal complaints have received little attention. This two-stage study explored 632 cases of sexual harassment reported to a community advocacy organisation in Queensland, Australia. Two kinds of sexual harassment are distinguished: quid pro quo harassment (an exchange for sexual favours) and hostile environment harassment (sustained unwelcome overtures). Only 10 per cent of specialised assistance cases involved quid pro quo harassment, with the remainder categorised as hostile environment claims, including sexual remarks, physical contact and sexual gestures. Organisational responses to many of the allegations of sexual harassment were inadequate. The seriousness of many claims was also concerning, although the gravity of the harassment was not closely linked with the likelihood of a complaint being formally lodged. Most cases in one of three state/Commonwealth commissions involved a conciliation conference and financial settlement, averaging A$5289. The study has implications for women’s equal opportunity. Among these, the study suggests that complaints encountered long delays and received small settlements incommensurate with harm. This suggestion recognises the needs to search for other solutions to sexual harassment.

There’s a Policy for That: a Comparison of the Organizational Culture of Workplaces Reporting Incidents of Sexual Harassment

Title: There’s a Policy for That: a Comparison of the Organizational Culture of Workplaces Reporting Incidents of Sexual Harassment

Link: pdf

Summary: (abstract)

It has been more than 25 years since the Equal Employment Opportunity  Council first published guidelines on sexual harassment. In response, many companies developed policies and procedures for dealing with harassment in their workplaces. The impact of sexual harassment policies on changing workplace culture has been met with mixed findings. The current study investigates the environmental differences or organizational cultures of companies holding formal sexual harassment policies using organizational level data (2002 National Organization Survey). Logistic regressions compared organizations with and without formal complaints on organizational structure, worker power, and interpersonal climate variables. Findings indicated the importance of negative interpersonal climate variables (threatening, bullying, and incivility) in differentiating companies who experience formal complaints of sexual harassment from those that do not.

The Role of “Real Rape” and “Real Victim” Stereotypes in the Police Reporting Practices of Sexually Assaulted Women

Title: The Role of “Real Rape” and “Real Victim” Stereotypes in the Police Reporting Practices of Sexually Assaulted Women

Link: pdf

Summary: 

Some feminists have argued that rape myths constrain women’s reporting of sexual assault to the police. The authors investigated whether myth-associated characteristics of sexual assaults play a role in police reporting behaviors of women. A sample of 186 sexual assault cases seen at a hospital-based sexual assault care center in 1994 was analyzed using logistic regression. A positive association was found between reporting a sexual assault to the police and two overtly violent components of the “real rape” myth: the use of physical force and the occurrence of physical injury.

Barriers to Reporting Sexual Assault for Women and Men: Perspectives of College Students

Title: Barriers to Reporting Sexual Assault for Women and Men: Perspectives of College Students

Link: pdf

Summary:

Barriers found to reporting rape: (1) shame/guilt, (2) confidentiality, (3) fear of not being believed, (4) fear of being judged as gay (male victims), (5) fear of retaliation (female victims)

From Agents to Objects: Sexist Attitudes and Neural Responses to Sexualized Targets

Title: From Agents to Objects: Sexist Attitudes and Neural Responses to Sexualized Targets

Link: pdf

Summary: (abstract)

Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social–cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceiversʼ sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In Study 1, male ( but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs (“handle”) and clothed women with third-person action verbs (“handles”) than the inverse, as compared to their less sexist peers. In Study 2, hostile sexism correlated negatively with activation of regions associated with mental state attribution—medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, temporal poles—but only when viewing sexualized women. Heterosexual men best recognized images of sexualized female bodies ( but not faces), as compared with other targetsʼ bodies; however, neither face nor body recognition was related to hostile sexism, suggesting that the fMRI findings are not explained by more or less attention to sexualized female targets. Diminished mental state attribution is not unique to targets that people prefer to avoid, as in dehumanization of stigmatized people. The current studies demonstrate that appetitive social targets may elicit a similar response depending on perceiversʼ attitudes toward them.

The Myth of the Ideal Worker: Does Doing All The Right Things Really Get Women Ahead?

Title: The Myth of the Ideal Worker: Does Doing All The Right Things Really Get Women Ahead?

Link: pdf

Summary:

In this report we address the question of whether the gender gap persists because women and men adopt different strategies to advance their careers. Is it the case that men are more proactive, articulating their aspirations and asking for more opportunities? Are men more likely to be an “ideal worker,” doing “all the right things” to get ahead?

The short answer is no. Among the high potentials we studied, more than half of both women and men had adopted the full range of advancement strategies attributed to an ideal worker. Furthermore, half of those exemplifying an ideal worker were also including in their repertories external scanning activities— seeking advancement opportunities whether in their current organization or elsewhere.

However, men benefitted more than women when they adopted the proactive strategies of the proverbial ideal worker. Even when women used the same career advancement strategies—doing all the things they have been told will help them get ahead—they advanced less than their male counterparts and had slower pay growth.